asker

Anonymous asked: Hi, have you ever have had any experience with SIADH?

I’m afraid I haven’t! I’m on vacation so don’t have access to some of my resources I would normally have, but it seems to be a disease process seen mostly in humans with only rare cases in dogs. If you have seen a case let me know, that would be interesting to read about.

Simple names for surgical operations

daughter-of-sevenless:

-tomy: The surgeon cut something.

-ectomy: The surgeon cut something out.

-ostomy: The surgeon cut something to make a mouth. If one organ is named, the mouth opened to the outside of the patient. If two organs are named, the mouth connected two organs.

-plasty: The surgeon changed the shape of an organ.

-pexy: The surgeon moved the organ to the right place.

-rraphy: The surgeon sewed something up.

-desis: The surgeon made two things stick to one another.

(via nursingisinmyblood)

radiologysigns:

What are the two diagnoses and are they related? 

ANSWER: http://goo.gl/AbTduW

Hint: this is also a common diagnosis in veterinary medicine.

radiologysigns:

What are the two diagnoses and are they related?

ANSWER: http://goo.gl/AbTduW

Hint: this is also a common diagnosis in veterinary medicine.

climballtherocks:

Prince Edward, a bulldog, managed to eat his owners’ false teeth. Somehow the owner managed to speak to the vet without them.

climballtherocks:

Prince Edward, a bulldog, managed to eat his owners’ false teeth. Somehow the owner managed to speak to the vet without them.

(via getmeintovetschool)

asker

cranquis asked: LOVED your commentary on the "worrying about med school debt" post. Thanks!

Thanks!  I feel a bit flattered having the tumblr-lauded cranquis send me a note :)  I enjoy keeping a few medblrs on my follow list to see the similiarities and differences between human and veterinary medicine, always a fascinating read.  Sometimes they’re eerily similar, other times I’m grateful to be working on animals instead of people! 

Ask Me Anything: Is it ok to worry about med-school debt?

cranquis:

thecraftypremed asked:

Hiya Dr. Cranquis!

One of the things I’m concerned about going into the medical profession is the amount of debt I’d be going into. I know money shouldn’t be of concern if I’m going into a career that I want to be in, but I also don’t want to be in a financial mess. How do you manage to pay off student loans while getting on with your life (having a Cranq-family & all that jazz)? 

EXCELLENT question - I’m going to start off by pointing you to me #financial aid tag, which contains quite a few prior replies/posts about this very question.

However, I also want to specifically address a misconception I detected in your question: “If you’re going into a career which you enjoy, and/or which is primarily focused on helping others, then it’s uncouth/impolite/a sign of weakness to express concern about the financial debt which that career entails, right?”

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Interesting perspective from the human side of things. While I think student loan debt is out of control in every profession, the fact that the MDs are having a difficult time is sobering to me. Especially given that I as a recent graduate veterinarian have student loan debt in accordance with physicians (greater than $350,000) and yet earn a salary that is a little better than a military doctor ($58,000) but not as good as a non-doctor research assistant ($80,000). This is average for veterinarians. Think hard on it - the only thing that makes it worth it is the passion. If you only kinda like vet med, run the other direction! You’ve got to love this to make it anything like worthwhile with a debt to salary ratio like that!

Yet another example of what can happen when your pet’s teeth are neglected.  Oronasal fistulas occur when the bone between the mouth and the nasal cavity becomes eroded.  When that happens, there is a essentially a hole between the mouth and the nose.  Food and hair can be trapped in that hole, as in this photo.  In this case the animal also had an infection from the ONF, resulting in an abscess rupturing on his face beneath his eye.  He was euthanized for multiple reasons, one of which being his severely infected mouth.

Yet another example of what can happen when your pet’s teeth are neglected.  Oronasal fistulas occur when the bone between the mouth and the nasal cavity becomes eroded.  When that happens, there is a essentially a hole between the mouth and the nose.  Food and hair can be trapped in that hole, as in this photo.  In this case the animal also had an infection from the ONF, resulting in an abscess rupturing on his face beneath his eye.  He was euthanized for multiple reasons, one of which being his severely infected mouth.

Fireworks Phobia

iheartvmt:

(by Kathy Diamond Davis, author and trainer. Part of Veterinary Partner’s Canine Behavior series)

Fireworks can turn holidays such as the Fourth of July and New Year’s Eve into miserable nights for dogs. To some extent this fear is genetic, but it’s also learned. Dogs bred and trained to flush and retrieve game for a gunner cope well with these noises, as do police dogs. Some dogs aren’t capable of a comfort level with fireworks, but a lot can be done to make this fear less of a problem for any dog.

Predictability

Unlike thunderstorms, fireworks are set off intentionally. You may choose not to go so far as to buy fireworks and have an assistant detonate them in a legal location while you train your dog—but you could, if you wanted. You can train your dog when you know other people will be shooting fireworks, and you can set up your training location at a distance from the location of the fireworks. This predictability is a powerful advantage in training.

Training

As in dealing with other things that frighten some dogs, your best approach is to work with your dog before you see any signs of fear. Ideally, set up with your dog at a distance from the fireworks so the noise will not be loud, but the dog can see that a person is causing the noise. This connection helps many dogs by taking the mystery out of it.

Food treats work with greedy dogs, and games that your dog loves may be even more powerful in helping the dog mentally tune out the noise. When a dog acts out an instinctive behavior that has been built through training and experience, the mind and body are strongly immunized against fear and pain.

The more you and your dog train together to make your interactions satisfying and strongly focused, the more powerful these interactions will be in conditioning your dog not to worry about the distant noises. Retrieving, tossing a toy for the dog to catch, or (with the right dog and handler) tug-of-war are the kinds of person-and-dog interactions that work as powerful antidotes to fear.

Move the interaction between you and your dog a little closer to the fireworks action a bit at a time. Be careful not to progress quickly enough that the dog will be fearful. Judging the dog’s state of mind is a delicate process. If you misjudge and advance too rapidly, go back to a distance where the dog shows no fear. Work at that distance a long time before advancing again. Slower is faster in this type of training. Triggering fear is a major setback, so try very hard not to do so.

Unless you plan to set off fireworks where your dog will have to be at your side, it’s best to avoid working a dog next to detonation. The noise can damage the dog’s ears, and there are other dangers from fireworks, too.

Prevention

Don’t leave a dog outdoors alone when someone is going to use fireworks. Besides the risk of a fear being created in the dog, many dogs will flee a fenced yard in panic and be lost.

If you aren’t able to have a full-focus training session, keep your interactions with your dog upbeat, happy and hearty. Don’t use a pitying voice or touch that gives a dog reason to be afraid. Act happy and confident, and reward your dog for confident behavior.

Ear infections can make noises more painful. Take good care of your dog’s ears. Pay special attention if the ears are not erect, or if the dog has ever had an ear infection. Dogs tend to conceal their pain as a survival instinct, so it’s important to make a real effort to know your dog’s physical condition.
 
Fears are often contagious from one dog to another as well as from people to dogs. If you have a dog who fears fireworks and you get another dog, working with the fearful one can help prevent the new dog from developing the same fear.

Extreme Cases

The same measures used for extreme thunderstorm phobia can help dogs who panic during fireworks. A veterinarian or veterinary behavior specialist can help with your behavior modification program and can decide whether or not medication is appropriate. A dog-appeasing pheromone diffuser may be beneficial.

The right confinement area is important during fireworks, especially when the family cannot supervise the dog. This is even more critical for the phobic dog. Dogs tend to like dark, quiet and enclosed areas to rest in.

Best Case

With a little forethought, you have a good chance of preventing severe fireworks phobia in your dog. The dog can learn to look forward to more dog-friendly aspects of the Fourth of July, such as cookouts and family games

The holidays may be over, but this is excellent to keep in mind for New Year’s. If your dog has severe anxiety during noisy times, discuss it with your vet - preferably before fireworks week, so they have time to work on a plan that will be best for you and your pet.

A huuuuuge spindle cell tumor on the thorax of one of our technician’s dogs, approximately 16cm x 12cm.  Given that it was an aggressive type of tumor I needed to create large margins around it, resulting in an incision the size of Texas.  What the pictures don’t show is the huge amount of vasculature involved in this mass — I had more than one palpitation at the bleeders in this sucker!  They tell you in surgery class that bleeding is good because it means your patient is alive, but there’s also the adage that “All bleeding stops… eventually!”  When I see a ton of blood all at once I do get a little nervous, like “Is this dog gonna need a blood transfusion by the end?”  However the mass came off well and I managed to close the massive, gaping hole with about 4 packs of suture.  The skin was closed with a Ford interlocking pattern, one of my favorites to do - feels like sewing but more fun :)

veterinaryrambles:

Merry is a 9 year old stray female cat, most likely spayed. She is currently living in a veterinary clinic in a cage. A Good Samaritan found her several months ago, with severe injuries to both ears. It took months but the scabs and infection eventually healed, though her ears will always be bald and she will always need to be watched to make sure she doesn’t scratch her ears. She is a little overweight and has dental disease, but otherwise appears to be healthy.

The trouble is, the good Samaritan, while she has been paying for Merry’s care, has been unable to find a home for her. Merry is shy in a cage, and doesn’t always make a great first impression because she stays nervous, even though she’s been in a kennel a long time now. She doesn’t seem to like other animals. No area shelters have wanted to take her because she has been shy, and is not perfectly healthy. Merry is trapped in limbo.

Merry was tested in one of the clinic rooms today with a staff member. To our surprise the shy cat didn’t bolt to hide under the couch, or run away - instead she purred loudly for petting and seemed content sitting on the couch for affection.

Merry could be a great cat in the right home - she just needs someone to reach out, and she will rub your hand for more petting.

Merry lives in the greater Los Angeles area. If you are anywhere near there and could open your home to a lonely kitty, please message me privately for more information. If you can’t take her but know someone or a group who would be interested in helping her find a home, message me. If you can’t help her directly but want to spread the word, please boost the signal. Merry wants a forever home - shy kitties deserve love, too!

Reblogging for the day crowd.

theexoticvet:

systema-naturae asked that I discuss herbivorous lizard and tortoise nutrition. This is a HUGE topic and really cannot be answered in full unless we are discussing a particular species. It is very important to know exactly which species you are dealing with and what they eat in the wild because some reptiles require different foods at different life stages and even closely related species can have different diets.

A good example is red footed tortoise vs sulcata diet. Both are big herbivorous tortoises and so should eat the same diet, right? Red foots are from humid rainforests in South America and eat lots of fruits and moist greens with the occasional animal protein. Sulcatas are from dry grasslands in Africa and consume lots of dried grasses, leaves, and stalks.  The base of a sulcata diet should be hay and the base of a red foot diet should be vegetables.

One thing to remember is that variety is important. Feeding a large selection of various foods that are appropriate for the particular animals is always better than only feeding a few things. Appropriate husbandry is also vital because even if you are feeding a 100% perfect diet, it will do no good if the temperature is not correct or their isn’t any UV light.

Merry is a 9 year old stray female cat, most likely spayed. She is currently living in a veterinary clinic in a cage. A Good Samaritan found her several months ago, with severe injuries to both ears. It took months but the scabs and infection eventually healed, though her ears will always be bald and she will always need to be watched to make sure she doesn’t scratch her ears. She is a little overweight and has dental disease, but otherwise appears to be healthy.

The trouble is, the good Samaritan, while she has been paying for Merry’s care, has been unable to find a home for her. Merry is shy in a cage, and doesn’t always make a great first impression because she stays nervous, even though she’s been in a kennel a long time now. She doesn’t seem to like other animals. No area shelters have wanted to take her because she has been shy, and is not perfectly healthy. Merry is trapped in limbo.

Merry was tested in one of the clinic rooms today with a staff member. To our surprise the shy cat didn’t bolt to hide under the couch, or run away - instead she purred loudly for petting and seemed content sitting on the couch for affection.

Merry could be a great cat in the right home - she just needs someone to reach out, and she will rub your hand for more petting.

Merry lives in the greater Los Angeles area. If you are anywhere near there and could open your home to a lonely kitty, please message me privately for more information. If you can’t take her but know someone or a group who would be interested in helping her find a home, message me. If you can’t help her directly but want to spread the word, please boost the signal. Merry wants a forever home - shy kitties deserve love, too!

equinevetadventures:

In the OR with Dr. Patty Hogan

(I thought this might be interesting for all the riders that don’t know what an OR for horses looks like and I like the B&W pictures)

(via getmeintovetschool)

Lance canine in a young mixed-breed dog.  The adult maxillary (upper) canine tooth is deviated forward, eliminating the natural space between the third incisor and the maxillary canine, where normally the mandibular (lower) canine fits in between the two upper teeth.  In this case the abnormal upper canine is forcing the lower canine out of normal position so that it sticks laterally out of the mouth.  The upper canine was extracted to try and encourage the lower canine to return to a more normal position, and to prevent future complications, such as infection and oronasal fistula, along the upper canine.  The lower canine is the most difficult extraction in the mouth, so if it can be preserved by sacrificing the upper canine, it is worth it.  The pictures show the tooth before surgery, the gum sutures after, and the length of the tooth.